Buy Property in Arlington, Virginia and You’ll Be Making a Great Investment

When I first moved to Arlington, Virginia, I was twelve years old. It was the same year that my parents decided to buy property there, and so this small Virginia town became my home. My parents were commuters to Washington, D.C., both holding government jobs, and our home was just three metro stops and a fifteen-minute drive from their work across the border and the Potomac River. It was a commuters dream: great schools and all the charm of the suburbs, along with an easy drive to and from work. My parents loved it, because the town was full of plenty of families, and thus full of kids to entertain their own. Like most things Virginia, the town is rich in history and to this day the smallest self-governing county in the United States.

Do a little research, and it is not hard to see why so many young professionals decide to buy property there. In 2006 CNN Money named Arlington the most educated city in the United States. Consistently Arlington has among the highest median household incomes, and BusinessWeek ranked it the safest city in which to weather a recession. It has been named among the best places to be rich and single, and Parenting magazine named it the best city for families. Everyone seems to agree that the decision to buy property in Arlington, Virginia is a good one. The resilient economy and great reputation have sustained a lot of growth and development, so parts of the city continue to just get better and better, with small shops and restaurants appearing all over the place. Clarendon, a neighborhood in Arlington, is exemplary of this phenomenon. Growth has primarily been around the metro stops, making environmentally friendly transportation easy and cool.

The neighborhoods of Arlington, Virginia are especially diverse, from Rosslyn, sitting on the Potomac with great views of D.C., to Ballston, a neighborhood that combines a commercial metropolis with suburban wholesomeness. The Pentagon and Arlington National Cemetery are among the most popular tourist attractions, but the real reason to buy property would be the numerous bike trails, the cities walk-ability, the great food, and the general community oriented vibe. Purchase property if you want to make a good investment, raise a family, or spend a decade living outside of D.C. and enjoying all the things two cities, literally walking distance apart, have to offer. I am not sure I appreciated Arlington, Virginia enough growing up, but in retrospect my parents made a great decision moving us there. They invested in a county that spends about half its revenue on education, a place where you can buy property and know that in twenty years your kids will still be benefiting from your sound foresight.